Professional Relationships

Through my Business Fraternity I had the opportunity to work with university professional on a whole different level. Myself and a co-chair worked tirelessly
in partnership with the Central Michigan University Career Services office to
bring roughly 140 business to our campus to recruit CMU students for internships and jobs across the country.

Career Services and Alpha Kappa Psi has a strong relationship as their role is to help student find jobs, and my fraternity’s goal is to uphold our 100% full time job placement after college. The relationship and the experience collaboration with Career Services,which is a group of 8 full time professional was like none else.

Career Services treated my co-chair and I as if we were one of the team.  They expected my co-chair and I plan the agenda, set up times and full on run the bi weekly meetings. Those responsibility were not only extremely intimidating but such an amazing opportunity to put my business and leadership knowledge to the test. 

I had to make big decisions and delegate responsibility while motivating everyone to a common goal.  Their “real life” feedback on how I handled those responsibility helped me grow tremendously as a leader and business professional. The tedious planning and organization of the event takes months, but at the end it is truly something. This special relationship between Alpha Kappa Psi and Career services gets to both reach their goals and bring jobs and opportunities to our students.

 

 

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Shaping People Shaping Business

The beginning of my sophomore year was the beginning of a new chapter I had decided. I changed my major and enter in to the business school and was ready to get involved in an organization that would enhance my professionalism to be better prepared for the business world. Human resources being my chosen major I looked into SHRM the Human resources group on campus and every time I tried to make it to a meeting it would never work. The pieces weren’t falling in to place. Then one day as I walked through Grawn the Business College building there was a student booth setting up handing out lanyards, sunglasses, and handing out candy (honestly the original reason I stopped was for a jolly rancher). The poster board they were presenting said on the top in big bold letters ALPHA KAPPA PSI- Professional Business Fraternity – Next Generation of Principled Business Leaders. It really caught my eye, I wanted to be a part of the next generation of principled business leaders, and that started it all.cest akp

Next thing I knew I was in full swing of the AKP pledging process. Learning their traditions, resume critiques, presentation skills, interviewing skills ect. AAKP girlsll preparing me to be more prepared for the business world. The process was long and a lot of work but right in front of my very own eyes I saw change in myself. I was learning more and figuring out more what I want to do for the rest of my life, my values, how the organizations alumni base and collection membership experiences will benefit me, and how I wanted to make a difference in the organization. Not even mentioning the friends I have met through this process and akp made itbeing able to have the best Big ever, I am never short of people to ask for help and advice.

This Spring being my first active semester as a member I was given one of the most important positions in the fraternity. I was corporate relations co-chair, I worked with my chair and CMU Career Services to put on the Alpha Kappa Psi Career Fair.jump start your career Where this year we hosed 145 companies and over 1500 students. This opportunity to plan an event of such magnitude, and to work with employers was an experience of a life time. Now as I was a co-chair this coming Fall of 2016, it will be my turn to head up the event, which I am very excited about.

Alpha Kappa Psi Career Day
Alpha Kappa Psi Career Day in Finch Fieldhouse

Another area within the fraternity that I am very excited to be heading is implementing actual leadership development practices into the fraternity. Leadership education is an area as a leader advancement scholar and in my everyday life that I am very passionate about. We, AKP say we develop principled business leaders, which we do with business etiquette and experience, but with no formal leadership training and education. As I make head way with this implementation and partnering with the Leadership Institute it has sparked my passion in Human Resources as I want to pursue employee training and development.

Alpha Kappa Psi is another very exciting family that I have joined and am very excited for the opportunities and doors that it will provide me in the years to come.

Mentor /Mentee Reflection

The day I chose my mentee on mentor mentee selection day I had vowed to be the best mentor, role model, friend and support system I could be, whether she wanted me sometimes or all the time. Luckily she became, and is now one of my very good friends. Our relationship is a little different than others. We not only are bonded together through a family of Leader Advancement Scholars, but we are bonded together through another family, the CMU cheer team. So, I got a different opportunity to spend a large chunk of thekatekelly summer getting to know Kelly (my mentee 🙂 ). As we worked tirelessly through two-a-days, running through the heat, stunting in the elements and laughing as we attempted to walk up the stairs and ended up crawling to bed at night. We bonded as friends and teammates first. I never tried to force my “wisdom” upon her, I continuously reminded her I am always here for you and if I don’t know the answer I will find it for you. This happened all before many of my fellow cohort even have met their mentees. When my cohort and all of our mentees got to spend that quality time getting to know each other Kelly and I had been solidifying our relationship as we went on a mentor/mentee bonding trip to eagle village. We got very lucky in the process in which we got to know each other. retreat k an kkate and kelly

To be a mentor can be hard though, it isn’t like a Greek Life Big, Little relationship. We are mentors, someone for them to come to for advice and to share their experience and knowledge of how to be a campus leader, even to learn to get through college. I could go on and on about Kelly and I’s relationship and on how I’ve been blessed with a great friend and team mate, how proud I am of her and how she has done in her school work, and pursued getting involved on campus, but that’s not the purpose of this blog.

As a mentor I really scollage k an ktrived to make sure we first had mutual respect, we don’t have a large age gap and we are going through very similar things even though I’m a year older. By having mutual respect, we both are “allowed” to confide in each other. This is a two-way relationship in which my role is to help her get acclimated, understand the ways of the LI, the introductory way to get involved on campus. With mutual respect, I can look at her as a role model, as I hope she looks at me as a role model. We learn from each of our actions as leaders as we strive to figure out who we are as leaders. I am lucky enough that we can do this together and that in the quickly passing first year I have made a great friend that I know I’ll have for many year, but someone who I have taught to not be afraid to ask questions and find answers, to be confident in herself and her leadership learning process, and she has taught me that I am still in the learning process myself and that she has my back too. This is just the beginning of a mutually beneficial relationship with a girl who I am blessed to have in my life that shares some of my passions, but is open to join me on our journey together to be the next generation of ethical leaders.

COM 461L Reflection

Com 461L has been a class that has been a very pleasant surprise. Before the class started a lot of us “cohort classmates” were dreading a course that would reiterate a lot of what we have already learned, or that it would be information that we wouldn’t really take with us after the class. We were very much wrong. This course has given us answers to problems we face every day as on campus leaders. Problems such as how to most effectively work in a group, how to be a follower, how best to work with electronic communication, as well as how to build credibility and so much more. Each topic we discuss what it is, how we use it now, best ways to use it and ways it could not work or be negative.

With the lecture of the ins and outs of each topic we solidify these concepts with a lot of open discussion and group activities. Group activities like this past week we are working on the topic of public leadership, and their communication techniques. We went over the, what it is, where we use it or see it in our lives, positives about it and if there are any negatives. We then broke the class into six groups and we simulated a recognition ceremony awarding someone the “Best COM 461L Student”. With that we had one “public leader” in each group and a script writer (public leaders always have help with their communication) and we each wrote and presented a different part of the ceremony. The introduction, giving of the award, acceptance of the award, building being named after participant, an inspirational piece, and closing words. We each got to utilize pieces of public leader’s communication techniques hands on learning a lot as well as having fun.

This group activity explains so much about the class and the professor, Professor Carlson. She knows how to get us to learn, and to explain these extremely useful subjects in a way that they will stay with us and we will feel comfortable implementing is our everyday leadership on and off campus. Not even going into the book she is maneuvering us through called the leadership moment, which tells stories of leaders in a part of their lives. Each story has a part of leadership that we are analyzing and we develop questions such as: “So and so in this moment wasn’t able to get through to his team. Why? What do you think he/she could have done to be more effective?” With these questions we, as a class have a fishbowl. fishbowl

A fishbowl is a way of constructively facilitating discussion. We deal out cards and if you get a fish on your card you are the original group that starts the discussion with your questions, and if you get an empty fishbowl you with get to save your questions till the fish break out of their discussion and come to facilitate a group of fishbowl card people through the discussion of the story that day. We all dreaded the idea of the Fishbowls, but to be able to read and learn from someone else’s mistakes and achievements has stimulated a lot of great learning conversation with lead to growth as leaders.

With all set and done this class has been one of my favorite CMU course that I have taken so far. Not one class period have I left not thinking that I wouldn’t be able to use the subject we talked about today, and I believe that is special! Go COM 461L!

Leadership Theory: POWER

Leadership and power is a theory of leadership that I have observed and experienced. Not only have I seen it through LAS protocol but through my everyday life at CMU. In the classroom, dorms, RSO’s, organizations etc. Leadership and power came from the French and Ravens ideas of the 5 bases of power. The bases of power are divided into two groups, personal and positional. Within personal is the bases expert power and referent power whereas in positional power it contains legitimate power, coercive power, and reward power. French and Raven conceptualized power form the framework of a dyadic relationship that includes person influencing and the person being influenced. The layout of their framework is set up, dividing the 5 bases of power into two different categories-personal and positional. Some followers respond better to different types of power. As a leader, power is usually given though the followers, so if the power is misused or abused it can usually be taken away by the followers.

“The world is based off a hierarchy of power and allows leaders to lead using their own version of power. Knowledge of this is essential to reach your full potential as a leader. Students should learn about the leadership and power approach because it is essential in developing how you will act when in power and it will help your ability to recognize the different variations of power.”

Through LAS our protocol asks us to do multiple things: take classes (all together as a cohort), do homework (all as a cohort), attend conferences (all as a cohort), go on a retreat (all as a cohort), Live together as a cohort, which is amazing! It can also be very hard. Many “leader minded” people in the same place we get to collaborate, experience, and work through everything life at CMU entails and LAS protocol. Two of the biggest road bumps we run into are communication and power. My first and biggest time I have experienced the use of the leadership and power theory was when the 2014 and 2013 cohort (mentors and mentees) attended eagle village for our Mentor Mentee retreat. IMG_0984Once being separated into groups we went through and got to take part in leadership activities. There were two activities that tested my group the most. Giant’s fingers and the obstacle course we had carry a sled full of balls through an obstacle course.

Through these activities we mainly working with personal power-the influence capacity a leader derives from being seen as a likeable and knowledgeable. Expert- more knowledge, referent- people who are more likable. Through the sled obstacle course it was a rocky start. Everyone had an idea of how they thought we should go about this activity to be successful. It was a mess the balls were falling out and the louder leaders were the only ones being heard. The referent power leaders were all butting heads. Until as a group we decided we needed to give an expert power leader the role of helping guide and lead our group. With their knowledge of how the course and the objective of the activity as a group we responded better to this style of power and were able to achieve our goal.

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For Giants Fingers the objective was a lot harder! The dynamic of the group was a little better after the last activity. Once given the objective and rules (a lot more complicated that the sled obstacle course) we had to move a set of tires of different sizes from one of three posts to the other side, while setting them up largest to smallest on the other side. The biggest challenge was that every person in the group had to have two fingers on the tire at all times and the tire wasn’t allowed to touch the posts as we wove it up and down to its destinations. Some just wanted to jump in and others wanted to compile a plan. As a group we then agreed upon deciding a plan to go about our activity. An expert power leader started to take the reins on the activity and everyone immediately got very frustrated. The tire was touching the post, or someone couldn’t reach the tire to have their fingers on it and we would have to start again. Over and over we had the opportunity to start again. As a group we were not responding to the expert power leader. Myself starting to observe the tensions and seeing the solution and need for a referent power leader. Recognizing my own personal strengths I started to use words of affirmation and calming started directing the group getting everyone on the same page. The group responded to the referent leader power and we were (after some time) able to achieve our goal.

 

All around through leadership there will be times when one leader has to take the reins and everyone else has to follow. With that every group is different and needs a different person (personalities/characteristics) to take over. Every group responds to types of power differently. As a leader it is important to recognize your personal power strengths and weaknesses so you know when your power style will work and when it needs to take a back seat.

#LeadChat Mentor Mentee Edition

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Q1: What qualities do you look for in a mentor? #LeadChat

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someone who acts as a role model and friend. They should broaden your perspectives to the world and as a person.

In a mentor I ideally look for someone to be my friend and to help guide me through life. They are someone who is here to be someone to listen to you vent when life frustrates you, be that shoulder to cry on when something hurts, to be that person you want to share your happy memories with and most importantly to be the voice of reason. When thinking of specific qualities I look for in a mentor I think of open communication, respect and sharing. Sharing your perspective, experiences and opinions.

Q2: What are your expectations of your mentee? #LeadChat

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I hope my mentee helps me grow as a person as much as I can help them grow. We’re in this together.

I’m not sure if I like the word expectation. I would prefer the word hopes. I have hopes for my mentee and whether they fulfill those hopes or not I will be the best mentor to them I can possibly be. My hopes for my mentee, so they are able to get the best mentor-mentee experience is for them to open up to me, get to know me as well so together we can help each other grow. “We’re in this together.” I have hopes that we become great friends and we have mutually respect for each other. I want my mentee to feel comfortable coming to me for absolutely anything. I want them to tell me about their day all the time. Ask me any questions about college or life, ANYTHING. I want to be that big sister, who has blazed the trail for them but also stands right by their side throughout their whole life.

Q3: What is the difference between a mentor and a role model? #LeadChat…

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A mentor is there for you side by side, you’re learning together a role model is someone you strive to be.

For a successful mentor mentee relationship you need to have a balance of mentor, role model and friendship. The best way I can think of explaining it is that of a big sister/big brother. In my family I am plopped right in the center of two other siblings. I have an older brother and a younger sister. Mine and my little sister’s relationship really represents a good balance of all three: mentor, role model and friend. First and foremost she and I are friends we laugh together and make fun of each other it’s awesome! On top of that I know she looks at me for advice. I see what she is going through in my past experiences for I am able to help guide her or even as simple as being able to say “don’t worry I understand, I went through the same thing.” That alone gives her piece of mind. Most importantly I know she looks up to me. She watches what I do from afar. When I make a poor choice not involving her at all she see it and takes note or if I do something great she sees that too. I work every day to be the best role model to my sister because I love her so much I want the best for her. Being able to be that role model I can help influence her to make positive choices even when I am not around.

This relationship I have with my sister is the same sort of relationship I hope to have with my mentee. Maybe not to the level as my sister and I but I want he/she to know whatever level I’m here for them to have that sort of relationship. I want to be their friend. I want to be there mentor standing next to them talking them through it and their role model as someone they look up to be or share the same characteristics.

Q4: what communication tools work best with a mentor/mentee relationship?

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More quality time spent together the stronger the relationship. Coffee date it up and talk until your blue in the face

To have effective communication you need to first have respect for one another and a willingness to get to know each other. Once that is established the more time you spent with your mentee the stronger the relationship. So for each mentor mentee relationship it will be different. You will have to see what you as a pair (or trio) want out of this relationship. You can set times you want to talk every day, week, biweekly ect. The communication tool that I believe will work best for a mentor mentee relationship is quality time together in which you can just talk. Just like a dating relationship the only way you can learn about each other is if you talk, have open communication, and share experiences.

Q5: Who do you look to as a mentor? How have they had an impact on you?

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My father, made me the person I am. He is the kindhearted, hardworking person I strive to be

My LAS mentor has been nothing but amazing and has taught me a lot but we didn’t necessarily mesh well with our hopes of the relationship. We had differences but our relationship adapted to be the perfect relationship for us as a pair. The person I truly look to for my whole life as a mentor and role model is my dad.  The tweet that I made in the short amount of characters I feel embodies everything I have to say about my dad. “My father, made me the person I am. He is the kindhearted, hardworking person I strive to be.” My dad has taught me more than I could ever comprehend. He has so much on his plate but would never think to not stop and support you no matter how busy he was. If I was to email him right now about changing my whole life plan, he may gently question it and ask constructive questions. After he would go and do crazy amount of research on it so he could be knowledgeable and support me in my choice. Then for weeks after, anything related to that choice he would send articles and websites and opportunities in that area.  He is my mentor and role model. He stands by my side in times I need guidance but is someone I have always looked up to. His calm, loving demeanor and his work ethic and leadership is all I want to strive to be. I am more than proud to say that he is my dad and I love him with all my heart.

Mentor Reflection

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The mentor workshop really reinforced all my feelings and thoughts about being a mentor. My mentor has talked to me a lot about the purpose of being a mentor and the process of selection. So, I would say I felt pretty prepared regarding the process. What really resonated with me was when they asked the difference between a mentor and a role model. mentor 2 mentor 1In my head all I could see was a mentor being someone standing next to you and a role model is someone you look up too. I then thought to myself how I want to be both those things to my mentee. A point the Mentor Workshop pointed out was how to grow a relationship. How we will start as strangers, which will be awkward but how are we going to grow that relationship. That brings me to all my thoughts on how/ what kind of mentor do I want to be. My mentor focused very hard on helping us (me and my twin megan) finding us as leaders and the person we want to be. He did it through many deeper talks and some self-reflecting letters, which I now appreciate. He took a more philosophical approach to our relationships.IMG_0981

The way he went about growing our relationship turned out to work fine but I don’t believe would be the process in which I want to grow mine and my mentees relationship.

I am a very “relationshipy” kind of person. I love giving hugs, and asking about their day went, being the shoulder to cry on. My friends since Jr. High have always called me mom. Now I’ve been really thinking hard about what kind of relationship I want with my mentee. I don’t want that mom relationship. I want to grow from my mentee as much as I hope he/she grows from me. I want to establish trust and loyalty, and positive communication, which is the strong foundation that needs to be made.mentor 4 mentor 3 From that I believe a strong mutual friendship can be made. We can go to each other in the good times and the bad time. For me to be an effective mentor I strongly believe from the beginning we need to have that strong foundation of trust and loyalty, and positive communication. That will be built through spending time together where we feel on equal ground. No one trying to feel more or less than one other. We learn about each other’s past, present goals and goals for the future. Go on adventures together, those times you learn about their personality something that you can’t necessarily explain. All those things build trust, respect, and a care for someone whether we have something in common or not. Those things will make your mentor mentee relationship thrive. Together we will help find who we are as leaders and I will share my experiences since I have already gone through them. I strongly believe putting these into practice will make for a positive mentor and mentee experience. I look forward most to the relationship that we will build and to be that person that he/she knows will always be by their side and there to help them, share the good times, and get through the bad times together. All while helping each other grow our leadership and push ourselves to go outside our comfort zone and open our minds.

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