Living in the Moment

Well friends and fam I know I haven’t posted in WAYY too long and I apologize. Every time I say I will write on the bus from place to place with class, or on the train to our next destination, but this thing called sleep totally knocks me out… So the next few post is going to be a TON of pictures and I will be covering the past 2 insanely crazy busy weeks I have endured and the visiting of 9 different cities, so hang with me!!!

Saturday July 2

The first big trip to Parma and Modena!! Here we are taking a trip to Modena

We went to a Parmesan factory called Parmigano Reggio were we learned about the process of making Parmesano Reggio (parmesan). They start their process my milking the cows twice a day (morning and night) the milking at night goes into these huge tables where they separate all night. In the morning they use the morning milking of the cow (all of it no skimming) and the data from the night milking and put it into these vats. We’re they mix in two more ingredients of redix and an enzyme found in baby cows stomach they mix it then I turns to curds then the mix the curds together with a giant whisk. It’s then a thick liquid they then put in a cheese cloth (linen) and put in a plastic shaper with a granite block on top working to press the moisture out. They sit over night then in am they get this belt with important info encrypted on the belt then to be pressed into the cheese. After that they sit with a steal belt in a really cold room on a shelf for two days to harden them. They eventually make their way to a salt bath. Which is a long tub with multiple 90 ib wheels of cheese floating in it with a container with holes in it holding all the sea salt sitting in the tub. After their bath they start the aging process where they sit on special wood shelves. The range for cheese to age is 1-3 years. They do age for longer, but they sell it between 1-3 years. At one the year mark the cheese master checks the cheese with a special tool. First hammering it like you would knock on a wall looking for a stud. They knock the cheese to hear for holes (they don’t want holes) he also gave us fun facts about the cheese: through the aging process the natural sugars in the milk (lactose) is ages away ( people like sometimes myself won’t have an issue with the digestion of this cheese, because the way they age the cheese there is no lactose) the sugars turn into amino acids that are also in our stomach that make it easier for us to digest it also contains more protein in comparison to meats of the same amount and takes less time for us to digest. (45 mins for cheese hour 4-5 hours for meat). We then got to try the cheese aged for 1-3 years my favorite was the ages for 2 years. 3 years was very salty and grainy it would be awesome grated on a meal 1 year is softer and not as salty. As you can tell I thought the cheese was pretty cool!!! (sorry there aren’t many pictures of cheese i forgot my phone on the bus…)

After Modena we went to Parma (I know it sounds backwards but the location of the actual farms flip flopped but normally Parma is known for Parmesan and Balsamic Vinegar and Modena for its Prosciutto) the prosciutto factory was also very neat. We first had to put white cloth coat things and a hair next to protect he meat. IMG_3253We then walk essentially into a freezer. It had extremely controlled temperature and it was the exact opposite of what it is outside!! Italy is very hot in the summer. We walked in and the owner (with our guide translating) talked about the process they shit in 600 pig legs a week all form special DOCG (geographically controlled) farms (meaning the origin the pigs come form are controlled). They refrigerate the meats and hang them in these tall hanger like things. IMG_3252They then salt the top of the leg area with a mixture of salt and lard. Which hold the moisture in and adds to the flavor. They also go through a branding and tracing code process. Since the prosciutto is DOCG that mean it has to be perfect and regulated to be able to receive the prosciutto crown branding at the end. They leg age for a long time and the smell gets this weird salty+salami+fat smell it wasn’t particularly my favorite. One of the last steps was the step of the expert (owner) he had 5 others who helped him the other parts of the process but this takes a very trained nose. They use the tibial bone of a horse that has been shaped into a needle sort of looking thing. He then starts poking the leg in 4 specific places saying that by smelling the needle after poking it you can smell if it has aged properly or not.

We then got to eat lunch at the factory in their little house/restaurant overlooking the valley it was beautiful and the ravioli and lemon cake were amazing. I also got to try a very popular summer dish of melon and prosciutto. I didn’t particularly care for it (I’m not a melon fan) but what an interesting combo!

To top off the day we went back to Modena were we visited a balsamic vinegar farm. Not a factory a family owned adorable farm that has been making DOCG balsamic vinegar four 100 years. This tour was a family affair and as the most wonderful Italian women in a bright red dress with matching bright red lipstick and her jet black hair told us all about their vinegar it was around 97 degrees and very sunny and I dint even care. First off I wasn’t aware that balsamic vinegar was made from grapes (I had never really thought to far into it I guess) they had their own vineyard right there on their property and the vinegar process f boiling and pressing room right in their back yard. They age their vinegars for either 10 years, 17 years, 25 years, or 35 years. Each having a very different flavor (nothing like the U.S) the older the vinegar gets the more carmely it gets.  For all 4 vinegars it is the consistency of molasses, and you are supposedly able to tell the age of the vinegar by how much it gets caught in your through and how much you feel it in your nose. Balsamic vinegar (similar to olive oils and wines) is a senses tasting process. We got ot taste all the vinegars and go on the grand tour. After we looked in the processing room we went into the vinegar house. The perfect condition for vinegar is in the attic because it gets every extreme of every season. Hot and humid, hot and dry, chilly and so on. It being super-hot the house was HOT and as we went higher in the attic is turned into a sauna. The first floor up held their most recent batch of balsamic, all sitting in cute little barrels (most small some medium sized) and they had special cotton clothes cover the hole to let the balsamic still breathe which is a important part of the process. We then went back outside for lunch. The family made a homemade spread of all different kinds of foods and desserts (we were told it was a “small lunch” no, we were totally spoiled) then the father of the farm started chatting with about 15 of us and asked if we wanted to see the really old balsamic they had in their attic he goes “it very hot but worth it” and we were all in. We went up to the “sauna” and went into the first room it had lines of barrels like the other room and the wall were lines with all kinds of cooking pans and utensils. Then we went into the next room and it had photos of their family all over and then one wall of pictures of their son. In their room there was only three lines of balsamic. Going to find out that it was their lines of balsamic vinegars they started when their son was born the next line was the balsamic started when his mother was born and the third line was the balsamic the husband and wife started when they got married. The last room also had pictures on the wall other than being blasted hot it was the vinegar that has aged the longest. The father goes into the corner and pulls of this super tiny little barrel and starts dipping spoons into it and obviously I was like “oh yay” he hands it to me and goes “100 year”. I tasted the first batch of balsamic vinegar the farm made!!! MY MIDN WAS BLOWN SO I KEPT THE SPOON. (again sorry for the lack of pictures i was really in the moment here)

Needless to say that day I learned a ton! Even though on the way we got trapped in a tunnel after a truck driver hit the inside of the tunnel ahead of us leaving us on the bus an hour longer, being hot, and exhausted from walking so much of Florence it was the day I was soooooo ready to learn all about this wonderful place called Italy!!

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Shaping People Shaping Business

The beginning of my sophomore year was the beginning of a new chapter I had decided. I changed my major and enter in to the business school and was ready to get involved in an organization that would enhance my professionalism to be better prepared for the business world. Human resources being my chosen major I looked into SHRM the Human resources group on campus and every time I tried to make it to a meeting it would never work. The pieces weren’t falling in to place. Then one day as I walked through Grawn the Business College building there was a student booth setting up handing out lanyards, sunglasses, and handing out candy (honestly the original reason I stopped was for a jolly rancher). The poster board they were presenting said on the top in big bold letters ALPHA KAPPA PSI- Professional Business Fraternity – Next Generation of Principled Business Leaders. It really caught my eye, I wanted to be a part of the next generation of principled business leaders, and that started it all.cest akp

Next thing I knew I was in full swing of the AKP pledging process. Learning their traditions, resume critiques, presentation skills, interviewing skills ect. AAKP girlsll preparing me to be more prepared for the business world. The process was long and a lot of work but right in front of my very own eyes I saw change in myself. I was learning more and figuring out more what I want to do for the rest of my life, my values, how the organizations alumni base and collection membership experiences will benefit me, and how I wanted to make a difference in the organization. Not even mentioning the friends I have met through this process and akp made itbeing able to have the best Big ever, I am never short of people to ask for help and advice.

This Spring being my first active semester as a member I was given one of the most important positions in the fraternity. I was corporate relations co-chair, I worked with my chair and CMU Career Services to put on the Alpha Kappa Psi Career Fair.jump start your career Where this year we hosed 145 companies and over 1500 students. This opportunity to plan an event of such magnitude, and to work with employers was an experience of a life time. Now as I was a co-chair this coming Fall of 2016, it will be my turn to head up the event, which I am very excited about.

Alpha Kappa Psi Career Day
Alpha Kappa Psi Career Day in Finch Fieldhouse

Another area within the fraternity that I am very excited to be heading is implementing actual leadership development practices into the fraternity. Leadership education is an area as a leader advancement scholar and in my everyday life that I am very passionate about. We, AKP say we develop principled business leaders, which we do with business etiquette and experience, but with no formal leadership training and education. As I make head way with this implementation and partnering with the Leadership Institute it has sparked my passion in Human Resources as I want to pursue employee training and development.

Alpha Kappa Psi is another very exciting family that I have joined and am very excited for the opportunities and doors that it will provide me in the years to come.

Mentor /Mentee Reflection

The day I chose my mentee on mentor mentee selection day I had vowed to be the best mentor, role model, friend and support system I could be, whether she wanted me sometimes or all the time. Luckily she became, and is now one of my very good friends. Our relationship is a little different than others. We not only are bonded together through a family of Leader Advancement Scholars, but we are bonded together through another family, the CMU cheer team. So, I got a different opportunity to spend a large chunk of thekatekelly summer getting to know Kelly (my mentee 🙂 ). As we worked tirelessly through two-a-days, running through the heat, stunting in the elements and laughing as we attempted to walk up the stairs and ended up crawling to bed at night. We bonded as friends and teammates first. I never tried to force my “wisdom” upon her, I continuously reminded her I am always here for you and if I don’t know the answer I will find it for you. This happened all before many of my fellow cohort even have met their mentees. When my cohort and all of our mentees got to spend that quality time getting to know each other Kelly and I had been solidifying our relationship as we went on a mentor/mentee bonding trip to eagle village. We got very lucky in the process in which we got to know each other. retreat k an kkate and kelly

To be a mentor can be hard though, it isn’t like a Greek Life Big, Little relationship. We are mentors, someone for them to come to for advice and to share their experience and knowledge of how to be a campus leader, even to learn to get through college. I could go on and on about Kelly and I’s relationship and on how I’ve been blessed with a great friend and team mate, how proud I am of her and how she has done in her school work, and pursued getting involved on campus, but that’s not the purpose of this blog.

As a mentor I really scollage k an ktrived to make sure we first had mutual respect, we don’t have a large age gap and we are going through very similar things even though I’m a year older. By having mutual respect, we both are “allowed” to confide in each other. This is a two-way relationship in which my role is to help her get acclimated, understand the ways of the LI, the introductory way to get involved on campus. With mutual respect, I can look at her as a role model, as I hope she looks at me as a role model. We learn from each of our actions as leaders as we strive to figure out who we are as leaders. I am lucky enough that we can do this together and that in the quickly passing first year I have made a great friend that I know I’ll have for many year, but someone who I have taught to not be afraid to ask questions and find answers, to be confident in herself and her leadership learning process, and she has taught me that I am still in the learning process myself and that she has my back too. This is just the beginning of a mutually beneficial relationship with a girl who I am blessed to have in my life that shares some of my passions, but is open to join me on our journey together to be the next generation of ethical leaders.

#LeadChat Mentor Mentee Edition

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Q1: What qualities do you look for in a mentor? #LeadChat

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someone who acts as a role model and friend. They should broaden your perspectives to the world and as a person.

In a mentor I ideally look for someone to be my friend and to help guide me through life. They are someone who is here to be someone to listen to you vent when life frustrates you, be that shoulder to cry on when something hurts, to be that person you want to share your happy memories with and most importantly to be the voice of reason. When thinking of specific qualities I look for in a mentor I think of open communication, respect and sharing. Sharing your perspective, experiences and opinions.

Q2: What are your expectations of your mentee? #LeadChat

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I hope my mentee helps me grow as a person as much as I can help them grow. We’re in this together.

I’m not sure if I like the word expectation. I would prefer the word hopes. I have hopes for my mentee and whether they fulfill those hopes or not I will be the best mentor to them I can possibly be. My hopes for my mentee, so they are able to get the best mentor-mentee experience is for them to open up to me, get to know me as well so together we can help each other grow. “We’re in this together.” I have hopes that we become great friends and we have mutually respect for each other. I want my mentee to feel comfortable coming to me for absolutely anything. I want them to tell me about their day all the time. Ask me any questions about college or life, ANYTHING. I want to be that big sister, who has blazed the trail for them but also stands right by their side throughout their whole life.

Q3: What is the difference between a mentor and a role model? #LeadChat…

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A mentor is there for you side by side, you’re learning together a role model is someone you strive to be.

For a successful mentor mentee relationship you need to have a balance of mentor, role model and friendship. The best way I can think of explaining it is that of a big sister/big brother. In my family I am plopped right in the center of two other siblings. I have an older brother and a younger sister. Mine and my little sister’s relationship really represents a good balance of all three: mentor, role model and friend. First and foremost she and I are friends we laugh together and make fun of each other it’s awesome! On top of that I know she looks at me for advice. I see what she is going through in my past experiences for I am able to help guide her or even as simple as being able to say “don’t worry I understand, I went through the same thing.” That alone gives her piece of mind. Most importantly I know she looks up to me. She watches what I do from afar. When I make a poor choice not involving her at all she see it and takes note or if I do something great she sees that too. I work every day to be the best role model to my sister because I love her so much I want the best for her. Being able to be that role model I can help influence her to make positive choices even when I am not around.

This relationship I have with my sister is the same sort of relationship I hope to have with my mentee. Maybe not to the level as my sister and I but I want he/she to know whatever level I’m here for them to have that sort of relationship. I want to be their friend. I want to be there mentor standing next to them talking them through it and their role model as someone they look up to be or share the same characteristics.

Q4: what communication tools work best with a mentor/mentee relationship?

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More quality time spent together the stronger the relationship. Coffee date it up and talk until your blue in the face

To have effective communication you need to first have respect for one another and a willingness to get to know each other. Once that is established the more time you spent with your mentee the stronger the relationship. So for each mentor mentee relationship it will be different. You will have to see what you as a pair (or trio) want out of this relationship. You can set times you want to talk every day, week, biweekly ect. The communication tool that I believe will work best for a mentor mentee relationship is quality time together in which you can just talk. Just like a dating relationship the only way you can learn about each other is if you talk, have open communication, and share experiences.

Q5: Who do you look to as a mentor? How have they had an impact on you?

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My father, made me the person I am. He is the kindhearted, hardworking person I strive to be

My LAS mentor has been nothing but amazing and has taught me a lot but we didn’t necessarily mesh well with our hopes of the relationship. We had differences but our relationship adapted to be the perfect relationship for us as a pair. The person I truly look to for my whole life as a mentor and role model is my dad.  The tweet that I made in the short amount of characters I feel embodies everything I have to say about my dad. “My father, made me the person I am. He is the kindhearted, hardworking person I strive to be.” My dad has taught me more than I could ever comprehend. He has so much on his plate but would never think to not stop and support you no matter how busy he was. If I was to email him right now about changing my whole life plan, he may gently question it and ask constructive questions. After he would go and do crazy amount of research on it so he could be knowledgeable and support me in my choice. Then for weeks after, anything related to that choice he would send articles and websites and opportunities in that area.  He is my mentor and role model. He stands by my side in times I need guidance but is someone I have always looked up to. His calm, loving demeanor and his work ethic and leadership is all I want to strive to be. I am more than proud to say that he is my dad and I love him with all my heart.

CMU Cheer: Trust the Journey

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As a CMU Cheerleader it is a great privilege. It takes a lot of hard work dedication and the ability to push yourself to a level you thought you could never reach. I already tried to write this blog once before and it was LONG way too long. I talked about my whole entire journey from the start to finish. I talked about the highs and the lows and the in between. It turned out to be more of a vent journal entry and I didn’t believe it embodied all I wanted to say about my experience. So I decided to sit on it for a while and have some time to even wrap my head around what I actually did to myself with my team for the past year or so. This past weekend I sat through the most beautiful 5 hour banquet that embodied the exact experience I wanted to share to all of you. Our cheer banquet highlighted MVP’s, Rookies of the Year, Spirit Awards, seniors, and our journey through nationals. We reflected all together why we do this crazy sport and put of minds and bodies though this. It’s because we love challenge, we love cheering for a school that we love more than anything, we build trust with one another that is unbreakable and we work for a single moment of 3 minutes on the national’s mat that gives you the feeling if you bottled up could power a whole city for a week or more! We become a family that will stand by your side through anything and will always be there. This crazy sport of cheer teaches you self-worth, confidence, how usually the only person standing in your own way is yourself, to reach for the stars even if you land on the moon, set goals and run after them with all you have, find passion, determination, love. Embrace pain, frustrating, let down, anger, nerves, emotions. Take it alllllll in and use it not just in cheer but your everyday life. Cheer makes you strong physically and mentally but getting there is a journey that you have to trust.

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Coming in as a rookies (first year cheering/freshman) I had no idea what to expect in a college cheer experience. High school cheer was all I knew, training to all be robots and we strived for perfection not necessarily to be the best individual we could be. To me that was fine I enjoyed the challenge that came from that, I personally found ways to push myself farther. High school cheer wasn’t for everyone. Three rounds of 1minute 30 second routines of robotic, yelling, movements. Round one motions and jumps, round 2 skills, round three tumbling and stunts (my favorite). High school cheer gave me a great foundation for college cheer. I knew body positions and where in myself to find mental toughness and determination. College cheer is a whole new story. We cheer for multiple sports teams but we also train for our national’s competition. We work months and months on a 3 minute routine. We stay at CMU over Christmas break training usually seeing our family only for a week. We do skills that look insane, we launch girls in the air, and tumble like crazy. At the end it’ll be the most amazing thing you’ll ever see but it isn’t always like that…

We start by seeing if we even make the nationals team. Myself I didn’t, I was an alternate so I would go to all the practices learn anything I could and get thrown in if anyone got hurt. It was stressful, there was no way to really prepare you for the text you get form coach saying today you’re going in. That first practice was a nightmare. I ran around the mat like a chicken with my head cut off. Trying to listen to directions of where I was supposed to go, I was excited but was terrified. Especially being thrown into a group with a vet 4th year (2 year cheering or more) flyer. With me coming in she had all rookies underneath her. She wasn’t happy and I was scared, intimidated and wanted to cry. IMG_1475Trying to find a group of 4 girls who mesh with each other to make a stunt group (a stressful period for any rookie) is a big process but being thrown into a group that doesn’t seem to want you, there is no words to describe. That is where my journey started officially.IMG_1590

My group trained and trained and pushed through pain and struggle. Turning out to be one of the most elite and consistent groups on the team–front and center. I was pushed to levels I never thought could be at physically and mentally. I pushed through my flyer and back spot getting hurt 2 weeks before nationals. My base and I forming a bond that will never sever.IMG_1521 Together physically and emotionally had to go through a week and a half I wish I could forget. To them coming back and putting on a show of a life time. Taking 5th in nation in semi’s to 9th in the nation over all out of 20+ teams. IMG_1506 IMG_1520A place the CMU All Girl Cheer hasn’t been at in years. It made every hour in the gym worth it. Every hit to the face, bump, bruise, tear, frustration and feeling like it wasn’t possible worth it. We made CMU Cheer history by taking both and All-Girl team (Me) and a Large Coed team to nationals and both making it to finals. IMG_1486We are now one of the top 40 schools to cheer at in the nation. I am a part of the family that all together wants to make this program and themselves better. I get to be a part of the start of huge pivotal changes in this program and wouldn’t change it for the world. I am and always will be a better person from this experience and I thank my coaches and this team for that. I bleed maroon and gold, CMU Cheer and everything this program stands for. FIRE UP CHIPS!!!IMG_1512

LAS in the D Post Trip: We RISE by Lifting OTHERS

I had the opportunity to go on a service learning trip with my Leader Advancement Scholarship cohort members, a trip we call LAS to the D 2015. The Leadership Institute (LI) supports all 40 some of us on a weekend that changes our life. We leave that Friday afternoon all packed up on the charter bus in our Khakis and colored t-shirts, excited and ready to rock and roll. Our first stop was to Jalen Rose Leadership Academy.

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A Charter school that is supported by our University Central Michigan University. We were going to them to meet with their freshman and sophomore advisories to lead them in leadership activities. Activities such as a game called gutter ball, which each students gets a wooded gutter, they only can hold it with their thumb and pinky. The goal is to work as a team and get a marble all the way across the room to the facilitator’s hands. With the hope that these students grasp some concepts of leadership, like: communication, teamwork, adaptation, open mindedness. Then later that afternoon we worked with two clubs/groups within the school PIOLT and BUTTA students, which were essentially mentors to younger students and trained to lead by example. We worked with them in hopes to train them to facilitate leadership activities as we did.

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After Facilitating with Jalen Rose Leadership Academy we drove to Ford Field were connected was and advertising company called Lowe Campbell Ewald. They’re a Michigan based company that came back to Detroit after leaving to come and support the local economy. They only purchase Michigan products, and only hire Michigan employees as well. We went to Lowe Campbell Ewald to experience the other spectrum of Detroit (the higher end). It represented hope and a future for the Detroit economy. las in the d 7 las in the d 3We then had the amazing opportunity to get a behind the scene tour of Ford Field. One of the large icons in Detroit. After the Ford Field tour and having dinner we went to The Detroit Institute of the Arts (DIA). An opportunity for myself and my classmates to experience one of the best art museums in the country. Looking in all kinds of exhibits everything from Edgar Degas’s sketch exhibit to a photography exhibit lAS IN THE D 10of Detroit citizens and they’re stories. We then went in stayed on the center of downtown Detroit at the CMU Global Campus outreach center. Where all 40+ of us crawled into our sleeping bags on the floor getting ready for another big day. We woke up bright and early and got ready to volunteer with a Detroit founded non-profit organization called the Motor City Blight Busters. A non-profit organization that was started by a local man of the town who took charge. With some help of a few who saw the same goal and some passion. Together they made an organization that works for the betterment of the community. Whether it be tearing a house down, boarding a house up, planting flowers, starting gardens, helping local citizens reach their dreams, helping local las in the d 2kids either give back or have a place to go. Blight Busters are definitely not short of giving back. We went and worked with them on the next step of a big project. They tore down some drug houses and wanted to make a farm. We worked on the step of putting the mulch down. You have to do that before you can put the manure down then another layer of mulch and then one layer of manure then vwa-la a farm! Blight Busters promo video with LAS 2014. Here is also the University Communications Press Release of our trip LAS in the D 2015.

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The most eye opening part of the trip for me was working with the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy Students. I personally had no idea what to expect. Many thoughts were going through my mind. Once we got there the first thing I noticed were small flags on the walls with Ivy League schools names and crest on them. These flags lined the hallways. I was kind of taken back, not really sure why they would put such prestigious schools flags in their hallways. I was quick to find out that these students didn’t expect anything but their best in what they did. Students were actually attending these universities. We then got with our groups and headed to the advisory class we were assigned. The advisories were divided male and female and then by grade. Those advisory classes would be with the exact same people for the rest of their high school career. My group and I were assigned a freshman male advisory. I was sort of nervous not knowing what to expect walking into that classroom. We introduced ourselves and began with community standards. Essentially rules for our group today. I usually encourage students to think of things along the lines of “RESPECT” they want everyone to be respectful while we go through our activities. They caught on very quick and took it very seriously, which I wasn’t expecting. A lot of times you get group who want to say silly things. They were spitting out standards like open mindedness, challenge yourself, courage, teamwork and more. They taking in what us as facilitators had to say as well as their peers.

The first activity we did was, an ice breaker. We had a beach ball with questions on it everything from what is your leadership style, to Pepsi or Coke. This is when I started to become truly blown away. These students who seemed apprehensive at the start were choosing to open up to their peers and answer deeper questions. We weren’t expecting the students to know their leadership style. One saying “I don’t want to bet e leader in the front but I want to be standing next to everyone as a role model.” Even to the question to what is on your bucket list. las in the d 17One student didn’t understand what that was, once we explained he told us her wanted to see his dad before he graduates high school. Students wanting to be like their older sister, get good grades, graduate high school. Things they were truly sincere about. They worked HARD to be where they’re at and are ready to work hard for where they want to go. Breaking into two smaller groups we started the next activity of gutter ball. Giving them the rules and objective they got started. They were all in, talking together as I gave subtle suggestions which they would dissect and try to figure out how to implement. They were growing right in front of my eyes. But then to debrief and guide the conversation of “WHAT”, what just happened, “SO WHAT” so what about this activity was important to leadership growth, “NOW WHAT” how can you implement what this activity taught you to your everyday life. That stumped them and they talked about team work and communication, the in your face answers. The lights even going out in the middle of our debrief. They didn’t even hesitate “oh that happens once a week” they kept on with our debrief. But I got to ask them about how they had to be open minded and how when faced with a challenge you had to adapt. I have never been able to facilitate such a group where they were so intrigued and absorbing my every word. They changed and grew right in front of my eyes and if we could have had just a couple more hours it would have been amazing.

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My whole LAS cohort and all involved with our LAS in the D Service learning trip displayed leadership throughout our service. Each and every one of us displayed servant leadership through our work with Jalen Rose and the Blight Busters. Focusing in specifically on one leader within our group our advisor Jesi Parker is a specific example of displaying leadership. She was guiding the rest of the group and being a role model for us to model our actions on. She is the ideal servant leader. She worked side by side with us when we were mulching for the Blight Busters leading by example and encouraging us to work hard.

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My opinion about Detroit has completely changed. In all honesty Detroit made me nervous. All the hype about how I should be on guard, which you should be in any city. After going on this trip all the stereotypes and truths about Detroit were brought up and addressed.  I was inspired to make a difference. Being there and being around meeting the students and seeing the art and the potential, you feel the love and the hope for not only a new beginning but a rebirth. They want to restore what Detroit once was and there are so many passionate people who and working to do so. Being there just ignited my passion for Detroit and all that it has to offer. I went from being apprehensive of Detroit, to wanting to embrace the beauty of all that it had to offer. I want to make positive change.las in the d 11

After this experience I feel passionate about making positive change. Being in Detroit inspires me to make positive change not just for Detroit, but also to make positive change for my own community. By volunteering for local organizations, schools, and making my home better place, by being a role model and servant leader. Blight Busters motto “think globally act locally” really hit home with me. Not only did the service trip give me an itch to volunteer and make a difference it revealed a passion of mine. After working with the Jalen Rose Leadership Academy students I was reflecting to myself about how much that changed my life. How teaching/facilitating makes me so happy. I got to watch them learn about themselves as leaders through my guidance.las inthe d 14 Through just their facial expressions and body language I could see the change. Those activities and debriefing changed those students’ lives. I taught them how to bring out their inner leader, showed them confidence some didn’t know they had. I helped them grow and invaluable attribute that will only mean positive things for them. Coming to that realization I knew that I want to do this for forever!

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Pre-Service Trip: LAS in the D

detroit skyline

The sad truth is that Detroit has many social issues. All the social issues are all connected and when one slips it seems that they all do. The social issue I am most aware of is the population issue. I looked up the specific numbers on how much the population has gone down from 1.86 million in 1950 to 700,000 today. Which has caused social issues such as the large amount of abandoned buildings (80,000). All these components put a serious strain on the economy and the current community. The community and family life is where the strain is truly felt. The poor economy and not enough jobs makes it hard for them to make ends meat. When there is financial strain children feel the strain as well which can lead to academic hardship.

The purpose of the Leadership Institute is to prepare Michigan’s students and citizens for leadership roles on an increasingly complex and challenging society. Their vision  I to prepare the next generation of individuals who will act responsibly to improve the quality of life, state of the economy, and communities in which they live and work. This service learning trip experience to Detroit relates to the purpose and vision of the leadership in all aspects. On this trip we will be having the opportunity to work with Jalen Rose Leadership Academy students facilitating and training them to facilitate leadership activities and grow as leaders. We will also be partnering with the Blight Busters and doing community service through helping clean up abandon homes, landscaping ect. Those experiences relate to the purpose and vision of the leadership institute by embodying them we will be improving those in the Detroit’s community’s quality of life, their economy and their communities through the facilitation at Jalen Rose Leadership Academy and working with the Blight busters. These experiences are also preparing us as citizens for leadership roles in an increasingly complex society.

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I think the Detroit trip will help me grow as an individual in many ways. Every time I do facilitation activities with students I learn something new. Whether it be from working on my toes or the students themselves. They always challenge my perspectives and to give them new perspectives for them to grow themselves. The service we will be doing with the blight busters will be incredibly rewarding. Any time you volunteer your time and know you are doing something so small that is contributing to something way bigger than you makes you put things in perspective of how fortunate you are and inspires you to always give back and help others in need.